Parenting

10 Signs You Have Mummy Brain

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Are you the proud owner/mummy of 1 or more young children? Do you find yourself questioning everything you say and do? Do you feel like you might be losing your mind a little bit more every day?

You do??! 

You probably have ‘Mummy brain’


Here are the signs to look out for…

1 – When you go to do the laundry, you put all the kids clothes in the bin and a dirty nappy in the washing machine.

2 – You have to go through a list of names in your head before saying your own child’s name out loud. These may include the names of your siblings, partner, or pet’s name.

3 – You find your hairbrush in the fridge and can’t remember who put it there (it was you).

4 – You go for a pee at 5am…one minute later you think “Did I pee or not?”

5 – Your little bundle of joy explodes (from his/her bum) onto your bed at 3am, you reach for the baby wipes and throw a towel on it, lie down again and think “It’s only poo, I’ll deal with that tomorrow”. You don’t.

6 – You have left the house in one of the following at least once – slippers/dressing gown/pyjamas.

7 – You have sprayed hairspray on your armpits thinking it was deodorant and been genuinely confused all day as to why your skin is a strange texture and you smell like a hair salon

8 – You have used black eyeliner instead of eyebrow pencil…this needs no explanation. Epic brows.

9 – You forget what it’s like to talk to people like an adult. You use the phrase “poo-poos” far too often.

10 – ……………I’ve forgotten…

…and the best thing about it is – they don’t care what a hot mess I am. Not one bit! 

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Skint Momma xx

 

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The “Terrible Twos” are they really that terrible?

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The “Terrible Twos”, are they really that terrible?

The terrible twos…the phrase most parents have heard at least once. From family, from friends, even strangers! It’s a phrase people throw around when your little 30lb bundle of love is throwing herself on the floor, screaming because you asked her if she wanted juice.

People look at your ‘terrible two’ year old, and then look at you with sympathy. You think, oh here it comes…”awh the terrible twos eh?”

Do you feel relieved or embarrassed that they are trying to show you they aren’t uncomfortable? Should you really have to excuse your toddler’s behaviour, or should you just ignore it? She is only TWO after all!

Sometimes I wonder why people feel this incessant need to excuse my child’s behaviour, it doesn’t comfort me, I don’t need comfort! I’m good, trust me. I have the pleasure of experiencing these ‘toddler meltdowns’ at LEAST twice a day, I’m totally accustomed to it.

My precious little monster gets up to all kinds of things every day. She’s so mischievous yet so hilariously adorable. I teach her right from wrong, I teach her to say please and thank you, she is not a bad child. She’s two.

Yes, she has drawn on the floor. Yes, she has pulled an entire roll of toilet paper out all over the bathroom. Yes, she has (almost!!) tried to drop the iPad in the bath. Yes, she got into the vaseline and painted her entire body, head to toe.

This doesn’t make me mad one bit. In fact, these little crazy things she does I find irresistibly adorable!

These are the memories I will cherish forever. These are the things I will tell her about when she is all grown up, and we will smile and laugh about them together.

When she starts acting like a ‘terrible two’ year old, I don’t yell or shout…I grab my camera.

I do this because one day she won’t be so small, she won’t always want to cuddle into me when she’s feeling happy, sad or just wants a hug.

I don’t wish the ‘terrible twos’ to be over quickly, she won’t be so little forever.

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14 Things Autism (ASD) parents would like you to know

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This is a subject close to my heart, and with the help of the fabulous autism parents over in the ‘ASD Support Group Northern Ireland’ on Facebook, I was able to share some of their words of wisdom with you all.

I asked them to tell me what sort of things that they would like people to know about their child/children who have ASD.

These are some of the things they said…

1. When you see my child kicking and screaming in the supermarket, he’s not “just being a spoilt brat”, he’s trying to make sense of an environment that’s over stimulating to him.

2. Lots of ASD children have great attention to detail and can be gifted in Art, Music, Maths, Computers etc…They can go on to do great things with the right understanding and support.

3. Some kids with ASD are so literal, that they may take what you say differently than how it was meant, for example a flippant comment from somebody could mean weeks of stress or anxiety for them.

4. When you’ve met one ASD child, you’ve met one ASD child. Just because your cousin’s uncle’s brother’s friend has autism too doesn’t mean you know my child’s quirks as well. All children are different and it is the same with ASD children.

5. If my child starts screaming don’t assume I’m murdering her, that’s how she shows excitement!

6. Please do not ever say “he doesn’t look autistic”. There is no ‘autistic look’. It is not a compliment, it is actually quite offensive.

7. Offers of help are few and far between for many ASD parents. One hour out of your time could actually mean to world to us.

8. Children, young people and adults with autism are different, not defective. So telling a parent that their child “could pass for normal” is not a compliment.

9. Please don’t send us the latest article that’s appeared in the paper announcing some crackpot “cure”. Many of us would prefer the money that goes into these sorts of research projects to be spent on services and support, which are badly needed.

10. Do keep inviting us and including us in plans but please don’t be offended if we can’t participate or need to leave early.

11. Don’t be afraid to ask how our child is doing or to ask questions about autism.

12. Please don’t tell us “sure all little ones do that” or that your friend’s kid had autism and they turned out just fine.

13. Be patient with us if we happen to get a bit snappy sometimes (lack of sleep and worry will do that to you).

14.  Finally, please celebrate the positives with us! Our children’s milestones might occur much later on than a lot of other children. When they do reach them it can be an extremely emotional time for us and we will want to tell the world!

 

Skint Momma xx

 

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